ANNOUNCEMENTS

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Cultural Competency Pedagogy in Graduate Public Affairs Education

This eJournal special issue will focus on projects and approaches to developing, implementing, and supporting cultural competency pedagogy in graduate public affairs programs or related disciplines.

Marla A. Parker, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at California State University Los Angeles
For inquiries contact: mparke17@calstatela.edu

April Jackson, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Urban & Regional Planning at Florida State University
For inquiries contact: ajackson5@fsu.edu

Lisa Turner DeVera, Associate Director, Interdisciplinary Program in Social Sciences and Specialized Faculty, Department of Urban & Regional Planning at Florida State University

We define cultural competency pedagogy as teaching that considers the cultural context of classrooms, as well as the real-world diversity that students encounter as professional public affairs practitioners (e.g. public administrators, urban planners, and non-profit practitioners). Other fields have long recognized how students’ cultural realities affect their learning outcomes. Cultural competency pedagogy aims to equip students to navigate and understand diverse environments, yet adoption and normalizing of such an approach in public affairs higher education remains fragmented.  Given the role of graduate public affairs education in preparing professionals for critical activities related to facilitating the public interest in an increasingly diverse environment, effective cultural competency pedagogy is necessary.

The goal of cultural competency pedagogy in public affairs education is multi-fold.  First, to live up to public values of democracy, justice, and equity espoused by higher education institutions, methods of teaching must consider how a range of cultural variety in the classroom provides opportunities rather than barriers. Second, it prepares students to understand how cultural realities independently and interactively affect outcomes of political processes and public institutions. Third, cultural competency pedagogy facilitates practical action in a way that can minimize crippling and caustic political tensions, while elevating healthy civil interaction.

Submission topics may include, but are not limited to, topics related to cultural competency pedagogy:

  • Innovative pedagogical approaches that enhance diversity and inclusion in public affairs courses (e.g. urban planning, public administration, sociology, geology, political science, etc.)
  • Theoretical and conceptual models focusing on cultural competency education in a public affairs context
  • Administrative and professional development (e.g. faculty training) efforts to promote and support cultural competency pedagogy in public affairs curriculum
  • Efforts to collect data — qualitative or quantitative — to assess pedagogy outcomes (e.g. results from classroom work)
  • Best practices for cultural competency pedagogy development and implementation in public affairs programs

How to Submit: We are looking for scholarly submissions on cultural competency pedagogy in public affairs education. We would like to include reports, research notes, descriptive essays, videos, interviews, photo essays, multimedia, etc., that showcase innovative or exemplary projects.   

Submission Deadline: April 30, 2018 (earlier submissions welcomed and appreciated). Follow the format outlined on the eJournal website at: http://ejopa.missouristate.edu/index.php/ejournal/about/submissions

For more information go to eJournal.missouristate.edu or email eJournalPA@MissouriState.edu

Call for Papers: Special Issue on First-Generation College Students

For this special issue of the eJournal, the editors welcome submissions focusing on research, projects, and approaches that celebrate and support the experiences, skills, and values that first-generation college students bring with them to campus. 

Mark Biggs, Associate Dean, College of Arts & Letters, Missouri State University

Rachelle Darabi, Associate Provost for Student Development and Public Affairs, Missouri State University

Tracey Glaessgen, Assistant Director, First-Year Programs, Missouri State University
For inquiries contact: TraceyGlaessgen@MissouriState.edu

Kelly Wood, Interim Director, First-Year Programs, Professor, Communication, Missouri State University

Who are first-generation college students?  Defined as students whose parents never completed a four-year degree, first-generation college students comprise a growing population at institutions of higher education. Researchers and practitioners have shown that:

  • first-generation students from diverse backgrounds are an increasingly important component of any institutional recruitment plan, as they comprise a significant portion of the student population at many schools;
  • how colleges and universities help their first-generation students develop their social and cultural capital is paramount to their success;
  • completing a degree can significantly impact a first-generation student’s future earnings and improve his or her life and community;
  • despite tight resources at colleges and universities, enhanced retention and degree completion for first-generation students can be a driver of and support for improved institutional outcomes.

Submissions Topics: The above dimensions of institutional goals and first-generation students’ needs are interwoven and overlapping. For this special issue, submissions will focus on: best practices or successful models that are supported by appropriate assessment or evaluation findings; presenting quantitative and/or qualitative results of studies relevant to first-generation students in higher education; or describing institutional best practices. Possible topics may include but are not limited to:

  • high-impact practices that support first-generation college students;
  • innovative programs (faculty-, staff-, or student-led) designed and assessed to advance first-generation college student success (i.e., persistence and degree completion);
  • partnerships that have emerged through the work of strengthening first-generation college student support;
  • Best practices used in higher education that influence first-generation college student support;
  • Initiatives and communication strategies used at your institution to create cultural change regarding awareness of and support for first generation students

The eJournal of Public Affairs is a peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary, open-access electronic journal published by Missouri State University in partnership with the American Democracy Project. For this special issue, the editors welcome submissions on a range of topics that center on the work being done in higher education to measure and/or strengthen first-generation college student support on campus, in the community, or at the intersection of the two domains.

In this special issue of the eJournal, the editors are seeking scholarly submissions that address efforts supporting first-generation students. In addition to articles, the editors will also consider for publication reports, descriptive essays, videos, interviews, photo essays, multimedia, etc., that showcase innovative or exemplary projects.

Submission Deadline: June 1, 2018 (earlier submissions welcomed and appreciated). All submissions must follow the format outlined on the eJournal website: http://ejopa.missouristate.edu/index.php/ejournal/about/submissions.   

Call for Papers: Institutionalizing Community Engagement at the College Level

This eJournal special issue will focus on approaches to Institutionalizing Community Engagement at the College Level.

John Saltmarsh, University of Massachusetts Boston
For inquiries contact: john.saltmarsh@umb.edu

Michael Middleton, Hunter College

Melissa Quan, Fairfield University

Current efforts to institutionalize community engagement have centered primarily on individual faculty development (to create curricular pathways), department-level engagement (i.e., the engaged department), and/or campus-level institutionalization initiatives. However, significantly less attention has been given to the institutionalization of community engagement at the college level within a university. Colleges (or schools) within a university often have their own well-developed missions and goals embracing community engagement; act as “labs” for testing new ideas, pathways, or strategies for engagement; and have their own natural disciplinary-related base within the community for engagement. This special issue invites submissions that examine organizational processes and components at the college level that support community engagement in order to create a culture of engagement within a college.

Articles addressing college-level engagement will be included from Weber State University’s College of Arts and Humanities, Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences, and the University of North Carolina Greensboro’s College of Health and Human Sciences, all of which participated in a research project on college-level engagement. In addition to these manuscripts, the issue will include articles on approaches to Institutionalizing Community Engagement at the College Level from other campuses.

As a general structure for submissions, each article should address:

  • the rationale for college-level institutionalization of community engagement at your institution, including the wider institutional context for community engagement on your campus. Questions to consider:  Do you have the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification? What kinds of institutionalization efforts have been implemented? What kinds of assessment led to college level efforts? etc.
  • the process for college-level institutionalization. Questions to consider:  Was the process led by faculty, by chairs, the dean? Who was involved in the effort? What kinds of assessments informed the effort? How long did it take? What were the interactions with other community engagement offices and activities on campus? etc.
  • the outcomes. Questions to consider: What were the results from your efforts at college-level engagement? What did you learn from the process? How has attention to college-level engagement impacted wider institutionalization of community engagement? What will happen going forward? etc.

The eJournal of Public Affairs is a peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary, open-access electronic journal published by Missouri State University in partnership with the American Democracy Project.  As a multidisciplinary journal, the editors welcome submissions for this issue from the fields of anthropology, communication, economics, history, human geography, political science, sociology, and many others.

For this special issue of the eJournal, the editors are seeking scholarly submissions that address the institutionalization of community engagement at the college level. In addition to articles, the editors will also consider for publication reports, descriptive essays, videos, interviews, photo essays, multimedia, etc., that showcase innovative or exemplary projects that speak to the theme of the special issue.  

Submission Information:

Deadline to submit: July 1, 2018 (earlier submissions appreciated).  All submissions must follow the format outlined on the eJournal website: http://ejopa.missouristate.edu/index.php/ejournal/about/submissions. The target publication date for this issue of the eJournal is Vol. 8 No. 2 June/July 2019.

For more information, visit eJournal.missouristate.edu or e-mail: eJournalPA@ MissouriState.edu.

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